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  1. #11
    TURK's Avatar You need to get out more (Gold)
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    Hi folks,




    Another chapter in my favourite pastime. Today I'm going to try 'carpeting' ...... actually, I don't like grey carpet, so won't be using stretch carpet as you can't get it in black, I'll be using acoustic cloth instead. Grey wouldn't go too well with my plan of a luxury limousine interior anyway. Black, black everywhere ( apart from the headlining ) as there's something about grey suede that makes it look like silver, all depending what angle you look at it. Acoustic cloth if some of you don't know, is like a thin carpet, much thicker than cloth, but not stretchy ...... so well see how we get on, as I've never used it myself.


    Cupboards, where the visible finish will be wood, such as doors, will be made of visa spruce but stained in mahogany, then many layers of lacquer.
    But lets not get ahead of ourselves, as I have the entire front cab to do. .......... in black of course


    Probably not recommended to begin your first foray into gluing fabric to surfaces, but I had to start in an intricate corner as I needed to tuck the cloth between the wood and the metal. My idea was that the wood panel wouldn't squeak against the metal van panels. I had recollections of my aborted attempt at wallpapering a few years ago ......... and that ended in tears :blg
    I limited myself to half hour stints in the van, as even with breathing mask on, and having spent 2 hours on the back of my van last time, I had to go home ill ..... 'Evo-Stick' is not to be messed with ..... you have been Warned ! >>







    I had to do this in one whole piece, as you will never get the seems correct, and in time ( the unavoidable peeling back of both sections ) will be all too obvious. I prefer the brush on method of gluing, as the spray glue is messy and usually ends up everywhere, including on your person. So I started gluing at the top, ten inch bands, and worked my way down, patting it down as I went along. >>







    I went right over the doorway, then cut the doorway out. >>







    I installed my seatbelt back in, and made in plinth for the foot of the bulkhead. Even though it's a bright sunny day, my flashgun went off on my camera, the result is the acoustic cloth doesn't look black at all ! but trust me, it is very black. >>







    All that hard work shaping the contours of the bulkhead to meet the body work paid off, it's one endless sheet of cloth all the way up to the door rubber. The angle of the shot doesn't actually show the curvature unfortunately.
    Note the my passenger door, already spray painted matt black .... Plasti-Kote of course. I even took the time to finish off the door pockets in black acoustic cloth, ( more on that procedure later, as that turned out to be a farce ).>>







    As the day was coming to an end, I had to put my seat back in to drive home, it's already looking quite cosy in there >>







    The following day I trimmed back the surplus material. For jobs like this I tend to use the sharpest tool known to man .... a scalpel, as sometimes a stanley blade isn't quite sharp enough. Cutting acoustic cloth tends to leave frayed edges with stanley blades, not so with a scalpel. During my drive home yesterday, I noticed just how quite the cab was, this stuff is definitely very effective as a sound deadener. >>







    And now for something completely different ! .........


    As my other project was taking shape, I was now in the position to build my overhead roof console from 4mm MDF. I had to get the front end ( cab side ) of the bulkhead complete, as the roof console bolts onto it. >>







    One other detail had been taken care of earlier . The mounting blocks for the roof console. >>







    One particular job I wasn't looking forward to, was to drill a 17mm hole in my roof. But I chose to buy one of these Sharkfin aerials as I liked the look of them, plus it meant that no more idiots would be snapping my telescopic aerials in car parks any more. So I rubbed it down with glass paper, ready for primer. Some of the very cheap ebay sorts have very bad reviews, so I decided to spend a little more 20 odd quid if I remember rightly >>







    As it's amplified, it needs a 12v feed. That I'll connect to the power of the headunit, so the powered aerial won't be on all the time. I'll also need to purchase an extra long aerial lead to feed up the A pillar up to the roof console. >>







    Bit more prepping and masking, and we're ready for 3 coats of primer. >>







    OK, my usual spraying technique ...... one thick coat of primer, let it dry, rub it down, then two thin coats of primer, gentle rub down ( scotch pad ) then half a dozen or so 'fine mists' of white acrylic spray paint. Don't know whether that's the correct procedure, but it works for me T: >>







    I had to make a safe work platform, as I was intent on drilling from the outside inward. I didn't know what sort of exit hole the drill bit would created. If it had turned out to be a horrible Jaggered edge, it would be easier to clean up the hole from the inside. >>







    If there was ever a moment to measure 'thrice' ..... this surely was it ! As I had previously measured the center on the inside roof, I transfered this measurement to the outside. I then went back inside the van, a drilled a pilot hole ..... it was bang on ! >>








    I was then happy to enlarge the hole with a larger drill bit, and then clean the edges up with my dremel >>







    I applied CT1 to the entire foot of the Sharkfin aerial, and bolted it down from the inside of the van ( the threaded bolt is cerated and bites into the metal of the bodywork making a good earth ) a poor earth will result in bad reception, as a poor reception will be amplified.
    I then sealed the edges with waterproof sealant. >>









    Job done.


    See you in the next chapter. .......








    TURK
    Yeah, baby ! ........ new Multivan 151bhp AHY 'BigBlue' ; ) >> http://www.vwt4forum.co.uk/showthread.php?t=1023689
    And ......... Lulu, T4 2.5 TDi short nose 126bhp > http://www.vwt4forum.co.uk/showthread.php?t=276554
    The T4 Quad Headlight Project > http://www.vwt4forum.co.uk/showthread.php?t=249064

  2. #12
    TURK's Avatar You need to get out more (Gold)
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    Need more ? ........ no worries



    In this 'chapter' I will concentrate on my roof console.


    The first thing I had to do was to workout the positioning of my monitor, as it will double up as a rear view mirror, as I've built a bulkhead, with door closed I'll have no visibility out back. >>







    Now that I have my dimensions and correct angles, I can cut out my two sides. >>







    A quick test fit shows how well it fits. Like everything else, it has to be a snug fit. Any movement and it will vibrate.
    Nothing worse than those little squeaks while you're driving. >>







    With my cab headlining back in position I marked out where the cuts had to go. This is critical, you only have one shot at this, get it wrong .....
    and your headlining will be useless. >>







    Now that I have my cut mark marked out, and I know which side of the line I'm supposed to cut to. Cause there's nothing worse, making a nice clean cut only to find out you've cut the wrong side of the line ......... it's been done before >>






    It's kinda nerve-racking cutting up a perfectly good headlining, using a good steel straight edge, and that's one side done. >>







    Headlining back in, and ready for roof console to be installed. >>







    Here's where I'm at with the console. The design is set at an angle as I can view everything from my driving position without leaning over to see what's what. The switch panel is also at an angle for easy access. >>







    These are the switches I'll be using. I tend to stick to blue LED's as 'indicators' for auxiliary equipment ON, like the headunit or interior lights ( you can hear the music and see the lights are on, so they're 'indicators' ). Red LED's however are for 'Warning' circuits ON ( like fog lights or my amp for instance, as those could be left ON accidentally ). Cardboard mock-up of the switch panel, the switch guards were very difficult to get hold of, in fact I had to get from a aeronautical place in the states. You don't want to be banging your head against all these switches ! >>







    After re-jigging things around a little, I managed to fit six switches on the panel, meaning five switch guards. The positioning would have to be accurate to the millimeter. As anything that is lit and out of line, is all to obvious. >>







    To avoid 'the wondering drill bit' syndrome, I started the hole with a very sharp bradle. >>







    OK, so that's the holes drilled for the aluminium switch guards. Next up is to drill the 12mm hole for mounting the switches >>







    So that's the first one done. >>







    And from the back of the switch panel. >>







    Really starting to look like something now. Six switches, should be enough to accommodate all those extra gizmo's I'm going get >>







    And from the back ....... I like neatness ! >>







    A quick assembly to see what the console would look like >>







    Roof console in situ. The plan for running the wires is well under way. The blue cable and the yellow one coming from the bulkhead, are for my headunit switching, as my headunit is powered via my leisure battery. Directly to the right of those two cables there's a dark blue cable with a red splice connector on, that's just a test lead, for testing the earth on the switch. As it's the return to earth that makes the LED in the switch light up. >>







    As cool blue LED switches are very bright, I'll have to tone them down a bit as it's illegal to drive at night in some countries with the interior light on. Originally I was going to use resistors, but I would have to test various resistors to find one I was happy with. But what if you changed your mind and wanted the LED a tad brighter !? ....... you'd have to de-solder that resistor, and install a new one. The alternative is a potentiometer, it's a 'variable' resistor. So I bought a PC fan controller, with the intention of taking it apart for the potentiometers. When it arrived, I had a cunning plan to mount the whole thing in one of the panels ......... here's what I came up with. >>







    Here's what the completed roof console would look like, viewed from my driving position. >>







    I decided I would solder the earth connections to the pots, as opposed to using the PC plugs, as it uses a 5v connection for the LED's on the fan controller. I then tested the pots with a multimeter, a rise and full of the voltage on the meter tells me they're suitable for dimming the switch LED's. >>









    So that's another stage done, for the time being. Next up ....... covering the headlining with grey suede.














    TURK
    Yeah, baby ! ........ new Multivan 151bhp AHY 'BigBlue' ; ) >> http://www.vwt4forum.co.uk/showthread.php?t=1023689
    And ......... Lulu, T4 2.5 TDi short nose 126bhp > http://www.vwt4forum.co.uk/showthread.php?t=276554
    The T4 Quad Headlight Project > http://www.vwt4forum.co.uk/showthread.php?t=249064

  3. #13
    arfur fox-acre's Avatar Unemployed (Platinum)
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    Excellent as ever Turk. Your console inspired me to do mine so it's nice to see how it came about. Stop moaning about solvent abuse though....you're starting to sound like my wife. Carpeting the van is the best bit of building one....whatever gets you high gets you by.
    Ven vamos a follar los monos

  4. #14
    TURK's Avatar You need to get out more (Gold)
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    Hi Arfur, and thanks mate .......... happy to hear that I managed to at least inspire one person to give the roof console a go.

    It may seem a little over done or even unnecessary to have a roof console to some people, but if you like your gizmo's as much as I do then an additional area is necessary for all those extra switches. You soon run out of space on your dashboard as you can see in the image below. Plus I needed a place to house my reversing camera screen, and with the adition of my amplified roof aerial feeding directly into the roof console, it all ties in very nicely >>




    I took this picture a couple of days ago ...... as you can see the PlastiKote had really stood the test of time. I did over five years ago now, and it's as good as the day I did it
    Some people say that PlastiKote will crack or even peel off in time, all I can say is, they must of rushed it or not done properly. It's all in the preparation, get that right and the PlastiKote will last for years.


    Edit; Sorry, forgot to mention, whinging about glue ....... just thought I would warn people about the effects of too much of it. If feeling high feels like being sick to my stomach, and my head feeling as though it doesn't belong on my shoulders, then I want nothing to do with getting hight ! it's not a pleasant feeling folks !



    TURK
    Last edited by TURK; 20th March 2017 at 02:47 PM.
    Yeah, baby ! ........ new Multivan 151bhp AHY 'BigBlue' ; ) >> http://www.vwt4forum.co.uk/showthread.php?t=1023689
    And ......... Lulu, T4 2.5 TDi short nose 126bhp > http://www.vwt4forum.co.uk/showthread.php?t=276554
    The T4 Quad Headlight Project > http://www.vwt4forum.co.uk/showthread.php?t=249064

  5. #15
    TURK's Avatar You need to get out more (Gold)
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    Hi all,


    I this chapter I'm going to be applying the finishing touches to my cab roof. I decided to go for grey faux suede for the roof lining. It seems the obvious choice as my bucket seats are black and grey. It also breaks up the colour a little.


    I've seen in previous threads the original poster tearing up the cloth from the headlining card. As gluing anything to that surface is quite difficult as it's so porous. I believe in doing a job well, which means I only do it once. As you don't want the fabric coming off in a couple of months. As I didn't want to strip the original VW fabric and the sponge material I did it this way ......


    Firstly I sprayed the entire surface of the fabric with hair spray. Loads of it ! when it dries it leaves a solid layer. Should be fine for gluing. It also gives extra adhesion to the glue. >>









    I love the look and feel of this stuff, even though it's fake it's almost like the real thing. At varying angles it sometimes looks like silver, brush it one way, and it'll look dark grey, almost black. I'd like to use it everywhere, but it's too light weight for that, but it's ideal for roof lining, as up there there's no heavy wear involved, on the plus side its also very light. >>









    As mentioned earlier I don't use spray on adhesives, I prefer the brush on method. I'm using Evo-Stick that's an instant bond, so after you've brushed it on, you wait till the surface of the adhesive goes tacky or milky in colour. I decided I wouldn't use the vacuum bagging technique as that seems too much faffing about for me. So I rolled the suede fabric in heavy plastic sheeting. I applied the glue in six inch bands, waited for it to go milky then rolled the plastic out patting down the fabric as I went along. >>









    If you did it loosely you should be able to pat it down into the curves of the headlining. leave it for a few days before the next stage >>









    I think like paint, glue has to 'harden' before you attempt to cut it. So with my scalpel I made some 'incisions' ! >>









    And the final product ....... just like factory finish ! >>









    Now that I know that my roof console idea will work, running cabling won't be an issue, and I've design the panels to be removed like service hatches, so I can add circuits without having to remove the entire console from the roof. I'll finally cover that also. Originally I wanted to flock it black. But that would mean sending it to the UK as nobody does flocking in Jersey. So I decided i would have to use black fabric. The first stage however was to cover the MDF with baize, this will give it a softer feel. I've allowed for these extra few millimeters on my headlining. >>









    I can't fold the surplus baize inward as that would make the internal dimensions slightly narrower. So I just trimmed the edges off. >>









    With both outer side of the console covered with black baize, all I have to do now is cover it with material. My choice of material here was disastrous, any cut what so ever and it frayes horribly. >>









    Not liking the DIY look, ie, edges where two pieces of fabric meet. Plus with wear and tear, those two ends are sure to peel back. Making the whole job look nasty. So somehow, I had to do it in one piece. Another head scratching moment ..... but it's doable ! >>









    Next stage is covering the switch panels and service hatches. I quickly realised that using this type of fabric would cause problems. The thing you have to consider is, the constant removal of the panels. There was only one option ........ spray the panels matt black. I'd already had very good results on my dashboard and door cards. But how would Plasti-Kote react to wood !? >>









    I didn't have any varnish about the place, so I spray painted with primer. I was quite surprised to see that the MDF hadn't soaked up the paint as I though it would. So I put a couple more layers on. >>









    I put about six coats of matt black Plasti-Kote on, sanding in between coats. It looks shiny in the picture as it's still wet. But when it dried it was matt black just like a blackboard. >>









    Getting ready for the final assembly. >>









    Headlining in and supported by 'L' brackets on the inside. If I need to remove the headlining for what ever reason, it's the usual clips above the doors and console supports are velcro. >>









    headlining now properly secured and the cab plastics back in place. >>









    On rainy days when you can't do any work on your van outside, you can always concentrate on your electronics projects.
    Today I'll prepare the earths for all the LED switches. Pretty straight forward really. >>









    This is a typical example of what I was saying about service hatches on the console panels. Ease of access. I'm now free to tinker around and run cables and wires. So all the preparation to get to this stage had been worth while. >>









    Currently I only have two running circuits on the switch panel. The headunit can be turned ON/OFF with switch#1 and the rear lights that are LED fitments wired via a voltage regulator is switched by #2.
    I'm currently testing various cameras that may be suitable for my rear view mirror. That's to follow. >>






    Hope you all enjoyed the thread, there's plenty more to follow.
    And hopefully somebody will find something useful.





    TURK
    Yeah, baby ! ........ new Multivan 151bhp AHY 'BigBlue' ; ) >> http://www.vwt4forum.co.uk/showthread.php?t=1023689
    And ......... Lulu, T4 2.5 TDi short nose 126bhp > http://www.vwt4forum.co.uk/showthread.php?t=276554
    The T4 Quad Headlight Project > http://www.vwt4forum.co.uk/showthread.php?t=249064

  6. #16
    Dazteen's Avatar You need to get out more (Gold)
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    Brilliant as ever Turk

    sent from over there

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    TURK (20th March 2017)

  8. #17
    TURK's Avatar You need to get out more (Gold)
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    Hi all,

    As I'm on my coffee beak from my headlight project ........ good to get out the workshop and all that dust for while ! So here's another update from my Lulu DIY build thread.


    In my mind one of the best 'updates' and most visually appealing mods you could ever do to your van, is to repaint the cab area of your van. Reading many threads on the forum, I can see that a lot of people want to do it, but are afraid to because of what might be involved. Let me tell you, it is much easier than you think.

    Firstly, disconnect your battery ( batteries, if you have a leisure battery ) with no power, there's absolutely no chance of damaging anything or harming yourself. I would recommend having a decent compact camera, take photos as you go along, the pictures will come in handy when you start reassembling things. You don't need a gang of guys to help out, just yourself, set an entire day aside for the project and take your time. There's nothing worse than racing through a job as you need to reassemble everything by 5 PM !

    There are a couple of very good ' dashboard removal how to's ' on the forum that show you where all the screws are, I can't show you the pics I took as most of my photos got corrupted when I had a PC harddrive crash last year.

    By nature I have an inquisitive mind, so I try to find out what I'm up against, so seeing these pictures is your first step in your discovery. There's nothing unusual behind that dashboard, just wires and plugs. The plugs ( or sockets ) are modular, very much like the connectors you get in a PC. So it's impossible to fit a square plug in a round hole I:

    On the plus side, there are no special tools required. Socket set ( to remove the nut on the steering wheel ) an allun key to remove the 'Jesus nut' ( the one under the bonnet ) and a long shaft philips screw driver. I also use wooden shims, like lollipop sticks, as I prefer to prise things out with wood rather than flat blade screw drivers that damage the plastics.

    This is what I managed to document, hopefully it's enough to get you started ....... Please note: This 'how-to' is based on my 2003 2.5 TDi very early models will have different electrics. But the dashboard should be the same.



    Begin by removing dash plastics, fuse box cover and steering wheel >>






    The cowling around the steering column is in two parts, top and bottom, top half, nothing in it, bottom half is clipped on and had the OBD connection plug in it. If you have no ECU you won't have this diagnostic socket. >>






    OBD plug just unclips, there's quite a few plastic clips, be gentle with them, or they'll break ! >>






    A friendly word of warning here, when you remove your steering wheel don't remove the retaining nut completely.
    I've heard of some guys smacking themselves in the mouth when it suddenly becomes free. Undo it a fair distance and wobble the steering wheel from side to side in a push pull fashion. >>






    Removing the dash speaker covers turned out to be a mare, as I had no idea of the arrangement of the clips underneath. In fact, I managed to break the clip on the right. You have to put your your finger nails under the left side of the cover and pull hard, it's almost as thought it's hindged on the right side. If I were to do this job again, I would leave them in place as there are no screws holding the dash in place beneath them. >>






    The nearside air vent, these you do have to remove as there are screws behind the vents. Spin it all the way round, you'll then be able to see the clip arrangement. >>






    A close up of the other side shows this side is different, it's like a circlip, and you have to pull forward to undo it. >>






    When I managed to unclip the left side, I had to rotate the whole assembly back round in order to pull it forward to undo the right hand side. >>







    Then it simply comes away. There's no reason why you couldn't do jobs like this days before. Removing dash parts like speaker grills would give you more time on project day. >>







    Here's a much better shot of the dashboard retaining screw behind the offside air vent. >>






    Before attempting to remove your light control switch, I would say remove the dashboard clocks binnacle first.
    You'll then be able to prise the switch out. >>






    Now they're undone they're ready to be removed. >>






    What it looks like behind. The brown multi-way connector sitting in the whole is the light switch control plug. There's nothing else behind there, apart from the cold air feeder pipe that goes to the vent. I also learned a valuable lesson here ...... If you do this procedure before the speaker grill removal procedure farther up the page, you can disconnect your speakers, and unclip the speaker covers without breaking the clips off them, as you can get your hand inside and do it from the interior. >>






    This is another one of those little jobs you could do a few days before the event. Nothing crucial behind there that'll effect the day to day running of your van. Unless the previous owner moved the hazard warning switch such as in mine. >>






    There are four self tappers in the top section that screw into metal clips, and only two that hold the footing in place. >>






    These pictures aren't in the order that I disassembled my dash, but here's another job that could be done before the event. Nothing crucial behind the glove box. The only electrical bit in here is the tiny glove box lamp. Just pull the fuse out before disconnecting it. Or if you're doing this on project day, then your battery is already disconnected anyway, so just unplug the light fitting. >>







    The heater control switches are purely mechanical. No need to disassemble it any further. Just secure it somewhere with tie tags. >>






    This is the allun bolt fitting under the bonnet. I've heard it referred to as the 'Jesus nut' I can see why ........ Jesus ! that's where it is. This is the last bolt that holds your dashboard in place. Once you've removed it, you should be able to move your dashboard. >>






    If you've found and removed all the screws on the inside of the cab. Your dashboard will begin to lift out out. The only thing left to do is to disconnect the clips that hold the heater pipes in place. Then your are free to lift the entire dash out. >>






    All those big red connectors that connect to your steering column and indicator stalks are different sizes. So when it comes to reconnecting, it's impossible to get them wrong. >>






    Now that your dash is out, spend a little bit of time sussing out what's what. Just familiarise yourself where things are and what they do. >>






    You'll soon discover that there's not a great deal to it as I did. >>








    Right from the beginning you should of treated your project as 'phases', now that 'phase 1' is complete ..... ie, you got your dashboard out. I've got my dashboard in a secure place, now I'll begin to reassemble my 'dash' for driveability. While things are still fresh in your mind start by reconnecting the essentials that are required for your van to function. >>








    As I mentioned earlier in the thread, I lost a lot of pictures. So unfortunately I can't show you the makeshift dash I made out of cardboard. But with everything reconnected, and various things secured back in place using tie tags, it was driveable.


    In the next chapter we'll be prepping the dash for painting. And I'll show you a couple of pics that I managed to recover from my harddrive that show the minimum equipment requirements for driving.


    See you then.





    TURK
    Yeah, baby ! ........ new Multivan 151bhp AHY 'BigBlue' ; ) >> http://www.vwt4forum.co.uk/showthread.php?t=1023689
    And ......... Lulu, T4 2.5 TDi short nose 126bhp > http://www.vwt4forum.co.uk/showthread.php?t=276554
    The T4 Quad Headlight Project > http://www.vwt4forum.co.uk/showthread.php?t=249064

  9. #18
    stuart89's Avatar Now you're learning (Copper)
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    Headlining looks great wish mine looked like this where did you get the suede stuff or did I miss it in the description if so sorry


    Sent from my iPhone using Just T4s

  10. #19
    stuart89's Avatar Now you're learning (Copper)
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    And also how much did you use? Sorry about all the questions I'm intrigued


    Sent from my iPhone using Just T4s

  11. #20
    TURK's Avatar You need to get out more (Gold)
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    I'd have to dig out my invoice guys ....... can't remember how much I bought, but it was an ebay shop ( best prices ) I seem to remember about 5 or 6 meters, enough to line the front and the rear of the van. And as fabrics tend to come in 60 Inch width, that's should be more than enough. Still got loads more left over as I haven't completed the rear of the van yet. Just search for 'Faux Suede' on ebay ........ it really is excellent stuff, can't tell the difference from the real stuff !

    Use a contact adhesive to glue it onto a surface, if you use a 'wet' adhesive you'll get 'soak through' !



    TURK
    Yeah, baby ! ........ new Multivan 151bhp AHY 'BigBlue' ; ) >> http://www.vwt4forum.co.uk/showthread.php?t=1023689
    And ......... Lulu, T4 2.5 TDi short nose 126bhp > http://www.vwt4forum.co.uk/showthread.php?t=276554
    The T4 Quad Headlight Project > http://www.vwt4forum.co.uk/showthread.php?t=249064

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